It’s no secret that Russia gets pretty cold in the winter, so it’s safe to say summer is a good time to visit. Whether you like Old-World architecture of European cities or geological wonders, this huge country has enough variety for any traveller. Here are four of the top things to do and see in Russia during the warmer months:

Moscow Historical Sites

The city of Moscow is more than 800 years old, and has plenty of evidence to prove it. While you can visit Moscow any time of the year, it’s much more pleasant to explore it in 70-degree weather than when it’s hovering around 14. Hang out at the Red Square, a cobblestone plaza that was established in the 15th century as a market. See St. Basil’s Cathedral, an architectural wonder commissioned in the 1500s by Ivan the Terrible and perhaps the most recognizable structure in the city. History lovers will be enthralled by the mausoleum of controversial revolutionary, Lenin.

The “White Nights” in St. Petersburg

As the world’s northernmost city, St. Petersburg is special in many ways. This city is located at the north end of the country near the Finland border, and is part of the high-latitude region that experiences an annual 24-hour daylight for a few short weeks in June and July. While St. Petersburg isn’t the only place that experiences this phenomenon, it certainly does revere it. Join in on the festivals, concerts, and all-night parties against the backdrop of a pearly-white glow during the weeks where the sun never sleeps.

A Road Trip in Siberia

A trip to the southern Altai Mountains, a region that borders Mongolia, China, and Kazakhstan, is an unforgettable summertime escape. See the river headwaters, placid, turquoise lakes, powerful waterfalls, mountains, and glaciers. Sparsely populated and ethnically diverse, the Altai Mountains are a great place for an off-the-beaten-path road trip.

The Deepest Lake in the World

Lake Baikal is the oldest and deepest freshwater lake in the world. The lake is about 25 million years old and more than 5,000 feet deep – an impressive sight. Rent a boat and go fishing on this crystal-clear lake, which ices over in the winter. Be careful not to fall in – even in July, the lake rarely surpasses 55 degrees. The park costs about 50 rubles to enter, so make sure you’ve taken care of foreign currency exchange before heading to this remote area.

Russia is by far the largest country by area in the world, and it can be tough to get from one place to an another. You can buy currency in the U.S. before leaving on your trip. For more information on our foreign currency exchange services, click Buy Currency on our menu above.